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1-10
Exhibit dates: 15 May-26 June 2004.
about the show
artist statements directions/hours contact
     

Kelvy Bird
"Ten"
full image

website

Kate Gakenheimer
full image
email


Amy Kaufman
"Before the Storm"
website

Joe Keinberger
"Ah, Success"
full image

website

Kelly Anona Kerrigan
full image
email

 

Karen Molloy
"Untitled 2"
full image

website

Lauren O'Neal
full image
website

Anna Shapiro
"Three green goddesses"
full image

website

   
 

Peg Tuitt
"Yemellis Niece"
full image

email

V Van Sant
"Portal"
full image

website

 
 


about the show
Curators: Susan Berstler, Beth Driscoll, Michelle Fiorenza.

artist statements

Kelvy Bird
The concern of Kelvy Bird’s painting is relation, with color serving as the primary representational means. She explores the spectrum between strong presence and shrinking invisibility; voices of all kinds – loud, forceful, still, receptive, excited, playful, watchful, and wise – take form in a parallel range of hue, value, and intensity. This range, mapped as an assembly of independent panels, combine and recombine to offer what we could call “visual conversations.” To become active participants in these conversations, viewers of her work transcend passivity by offering an additional voice, or tone, of their conscious or unconscious choosing. The way a person interacts with the work becomes as relevant to the piece as the way two color segments join, the way the pieces rest within the room, and the way the room, the residence, exists within its broader community. It is only through this kind of recursive interaction that a systemic loop of engagement will start to emerge between the artist, the work, the participant, and the environment. And, it is within this same recursion that inquiry may open around the relationship of neighboring, yet disparate, parts.

Kate Gakenheimer
About a year ago I read a biography of the wives of Henry V111 and was instantly taken with them. Each of the six was so distinct from the others, in her motives, her strengths and her personality. You could say that Katherine Howard was weak, a child and a pawn, that Katherine of Aragon had the moral fortitude of a saint and that Anne Boleyn was ambitious and as strong willed as a force of nature. But they were all married to the same man and they each navigated him and the political system of the day with greater or lesser degrees of success.
Their court portraits were very viscerally intriguing to me; their elaborate corsets and bonnets, rigid postures and white faces gleamed against the dour backdrops. After doing a couple of oil paintings on wood I wanted to further explore this contrast of light and dark and started experimenting with glass paints. My five years of work at a stained glass studio and our restoration of various church windows gave me experience with glass paints and some inkling of how these portraits on glass were originally done. Due to the different firing temperatures of different glass paints and the necessary application of multiple layers, each piece was fired in a kiln at least four times.
It's no mistake that history has remembered these women; that they stand out from the hundreds of wives of English monarchs through the centuries that are largely forgotten. And I believe it is for more than the macabre circumstances of two of their deaths. The wives individual stories and their collective impact on history are compelling.

Amy Kaufman
Amy Kaufman, a noted New England artist, is particularly acclaimed for her painted monotypes. A native of Newton, Massachusetts, Kaufman received her B.A. from Brandeis University—where she learned printmaking from Michael Mazur, and her M.F.A. from University of Pennsylvania. She continued her studies at Massachusetts College of Art and School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Kaufman has participated in workshops with Eric Fischl, Wolf Kahn, Larry Rivers, and Lois Tarlow. She is a member of the Medici Society-SMFA, Boston and the Women's Caucus for Art. She is also a Corporate Artist for the DeCordova Museum Corporate Program. She has worked at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Art New England magazine. Kaufman's art is in many collections nationwide. She has received awards and has exhibited extensively in museums and galleries throughout New England, Philadelphia—including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and New York. In Massachusetts, you can see her art at Left Bank Gallery in Wellfleet, Depot Square Gallery in Lexington, and Diana Levine Fine Art in Boston.

Joe Keinberger
Joe Keinberger grew up in Massachussetts and moved into Boston while attending Mass art. His art has always dealt with the macabre and can be at times darkly humorous and unsettling. Most of his work consists of quick gestural lines in ink or pencil on top of built up textures of acrylic and collage on masonite or paper. He currently lives in Somerville and is a freelance illustrator artist and sign maker.

Kelly Anona Kerrigan
Originally from New Hampshire, Kelly Anona Kerrigan received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting from Boston University with a minor in Art History. After working for several years as a stitcher in the Boston Ballet costume shop, she earned a Post Baccalaureate certificate from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, where she is currently working towards a Master of Fine Arts degree with a concentration in painting.

Lauren O'Neal
Lauren O'Neal's work explores states of strangeness, intimacy, proximity, and contingency. Oftentimes, she use various alternative photography processes to create story fragments or commentary, sometimes with text, sometimes without. O'Neal likes the beginning that a photograph can provide, but enjoys coaxing the image off into other directions. Re-using, reconfiguring, and recasting photographic imagery, from found images to family snapshots, allows her to be in conversation with an earlier, or just imagined self, and to explore the in-between quality of memory and longing.
O'Neal is also interested in incidental spaces – what’s behind, underneath, in-between or hard to see. What is the residue from our built environment? Emotional spillage that seeps into the pores of a building, only to be recognized under the cast of a certain light? She looks upon these as sometimes humorous, sometimes ominous, and sometimes simply there, all in a way to classify and explore elliptical, incomplete and transitory systems of being and knowing.
Her intent is to offer a shift, so that a different type of looking emerges: a glance, a peripheral view, where we suspend our notions of reality and allow for ordinary strangeness to enter our field of vision. Glance-time is both fix and flux. A glance reveals absurdity and desire, and celebrates the necessity of contradictory thinking.

Anna Shapiro
Anna Shapiro incorporates a sensuous and surreal world-view in her drawings and sculptures. She makes plays with gallery spaces and public spaces, combining everyday objects with the human form and the invisible (made visible).
Anna exhibits throughout New England. She has won numerous awards and residencies in the Boston area. In 2003 she had work in “introduction” at the judi rotenberg gallery , “info@blah”: organization and overload at the Mills Gallery during Boston’s CyberArts Festival and at the Zeitgeist gallery for “Code Orange”. This year she is pariticpating in the PsygeoConProvFlux, a psychogeography Multimedia event in Providence, (e)Vent, a social action Drawing event in the South End and plans on exhibiting in the Somerville and Boston area this Fall. You can find her drawings in the Bernard Toale Drawing Project.

Peg Tuitt
Peg Tuitt is a Somerville-based, documentary photographer and instructor whose work has been exhibited widely in the greater Boston area, in such venues as the Museum of the National Center for Afro-American Artists, the Old South Meetinghouse, the New Bedford Public Libraries, the Artists’ Foundation Gallery, and the Brickbottom Artists’ Gallery. Most recently her work was included in ‘15th Annual Benefit Art Auction’ at MassArt, ‘Lost Theatres’ at the Somerville Museum the ‘School of Design Faculty Show’ at the Gallery at Mount Ida College in Newton.
Working primarily in black and white for over 10 years, her work includes but is not limited to portraiture, social and historical documentation, and landscape. She uses photography as a tool to advance dialogues around social issues, as well as to provoke the viewer to re-examine the often-overlooked ordinary, familiar and common place elements around them.
Her projects have included documentation of Boston’s elevated Orange Line and the Old South Meetinghouse, senior citizens, artists, and community and family traditions. Most recently, she conducted independent research on the Art and Culture of Cuba, in affiliation with the University of Georgia’s Lamar Dodd School of Art.

 

The Nave Gallery, P.O. Box 43600, Somerville, MA 02143. © 2004-2009. All rights reserved. info@navegallery.org

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