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'leave the light on'
Exhibit dates: 13 July-5 August 2007. Reception: 13 July.
about the show
artist statements directions/hours contact

     
   
 
Maria Davis
"Rebecca"
36" x 24"
cloth, stiching, paint and ink
full image
 

Kristen Day
"Paris/625"
12 "x 14"
goache on board
full image

  Beth Driscoll
"Briana"
20" x 24"
silver gelatin photograph
full image


  Rebecca Hesketh
"Huntress"
11" x 14"
goache and ink on board
full image
     
Briana Horrigan
"I would live it again"
8" x 11"
goache and ink on paper
full image
  Joe Keinberger
"The Grover Hills Man Bat"
8" x 10"
graphite and ink on paper
full image
 

Alethea Roy
"Beth-Miraj"
11" x 17"
goache and ink on board
full image

  Cerebot
"10 dollar bill"
6’ x 2.5’
pen and ink
full image
           
PRINCESSdie
"andir(V)"
10’ x 7’ visual
ghetto tech
full image
 
     


about the show
Curator: Beth Driscoll

Light n., adj. something that makes things visible or affords illumination,

The sense that we’re making it up as we go along both challenges and inspires most of the artists that I know. Our search for sustainable ways to be inspired and productive is just one part of our job description. The markers along this path can take every kind of form including those of: places, ideas and people.
As artists we can serve as beacons to one another at that intersection where our paths cross. The motley crew organized before you represents just such an intersection. The point on the map that we’ve organized around is the little house studios, a tiny studio building in Somerville, Mass. from which we’ve all worked in one capacity or another over the past year.
The structured influences of the collaborative groups; the Lady cougars all girl art gang. The miracle 5 and the olde ghosts are all well represented here as well as the less deliberate ways that artist’s work cross-pollinates.
As an organizing principle we’ve chosen to work in portraiture for this show in order to provide the viewer a means to better tease out the connections and influences between the artists represented.
Scul’s film”operation superposi” is a representation of another way that people band together and find inspiration and as such we look forward to having it screened at our opening on July 13th.
This group of artists has left the light on for one another through their collective generosity in sharing their time, space, work and energy. Thank you for coming to our show we’ll leave the light on for you.

artist statements

Maria Davis
My artistic style can be defined by indecision. I’m constantly experimenting with new mediums and styles. In the past I have utilized many mediums to execute my artistic vision, including; stained glass, burlesque, painting, print, photo, drawing, and sculpture.
When I approached the Lady Cougars portrait project, I wanted to find a medium that best expressed my role in the group. Combining the fabrics I use in burlesque with the
artistic process of stained glass, I began creating my fabric portraits.
I wanted the portraits to reveal each woman’s personality with quiet simplicity. Seeing these amazing women broken up into basic shapes and colors enabled me to view them in a stripped down, childlike vision for the first time. In doing this I found rage, love, genius, coyness, sensuality, power, beauty, and pain. I also discovered that these are qualities we all share and have used as a vehicle for our artistic synthesis.

Kristen Day
Kristen Day attended the Maryland institute of Art from 1990-1991. She finished her education at The Massachusetts College of Art with a Bachelors of fine arts in 1997. She has shown at galleries and restaurants in Boston and Cambridge and has participated in open studios in Boston and Somerville."I believe that art should be fun and fun should be art."

Beth Driscoll
I’m interested in the photograph as construct. I use the medium to explore issues which include; identity, sexuality and trauma. I’ve found self-portraiture to be one effective means to this end. For the Lady Cougars portrait project I began with a self-portrait painted or drawn by each woman. The idea being to reverse the standard of working from a photograph. I turned each woman’s self-representation into my own version of her. I hope that I’ve captured some sliver of the tension between the way that I see these women and the way that they depict themselves.

Rebecca Hesketh
More than anything I love to create images of people-especially those of the fairer sex. Features slight or exaggerated hair-pin straight or naturally curled, limbs-willowy but luscious, breasts and booties curvy and lovely.
I will never cease to be enchanted by the specific variations of an individual lady and the uncanny similarities residing in them all.
When I began my interest in drawing ladies I would mainly depict those that I didn’t know. I would loosely base a portrait on a girl in a magazine or someone I saw on the street-always a stranger. I would put them in the context of a vague setting and perhaps add some ambiguous text to portray an alluring but slightly cold visage.
Although the pieces I’ve made for this specific Lady Cougar portrait project also have feelings of distance and contradictory female desires, I feel an overall more intimate affection for each. I feel this way of course because each of these ladies is in my life, but I think this sense is translated to the unknowing viewer as well.
I suppose there is an innate grace that comes through when an artist looks beyond the flesh and towards the heart.

Briana Horrigan
If I had to describe the weight on my chest, I would call it an owl when I stand, a hare when I sit and a cold, sturdy narwhal when I lay in my bed, treading water alone in the orange pool of streetlight. I imagine wrapping my arms around a massive clammy neck, to see one black eye blink a wrinkled lid in understanding. I will press my lips to the cool corner of his mouth, then his rough ropy horn, and I will hold his flipper in my hand like a paperback novel, like a cabbage leaf, like a long braid in my hair. I squeeze so tightly his skin seems a sponge releasing and I’m drenched and calm and finally I feel only water rushing over me and at long last I am smooth and weightless.

Joe Keinberger
I have always been fascinated by scoundrels. For "Leave the Light On" my portraits are of fictitious ne'er do wells who have taken part in some of the darker events of our history. It has given me an opportunity to have some fun and give a little bit of a background on some of the creatures that inhabit my paintings.
They are inspired by the look of early civil war era photographs, specifically portraits, using graphite and inks to simulate the deterioration and coloring. I have tried to retain some of the mystery that makes such photos so appealing to me by giving some details of the subject's history, but not their motives, leaving that up to the viewer to ascertain.

Alethea Roy
Most often I work in self-portraiture and I attempt to communicate that which is deeply felt, but suffers a loss when put into words. Much of my work deals with my obsessive-compulsive tendencies, body image, sexuality, loss and longing, and unfulfilled desires. More recently, I have become interested in how to define these larger than life self-narratives in fictionalized autobiographical accounts of my life in a mythological or fairy tale context. Myths and fairy tales have a universality, they are an expression of our connectedness in feelings and experiences that are, conversely, solitary.
I began these sketches of my sister Lady Cougars by placing each woman within the context of a very specific monster archetype. There are many connections between the way that these monsters have been historically defined and how I am choosing to define these women. I can only hope that I capture a glimmer of their complexity and depth in these portraits.

Cerebot
Without authorization, Boutet Lobster Claw, an active member of the superhero art collective The Miracle Five; in cahoots with Cerebot, placed his portrait on this ten dollar currency note. Cerebot designed all of the intricate details on the note using as inspiration Boutet’s sea faring origin and visual vocabulary. This insubordinate act led congress to pass legislation banning the portrait of living persons on all bank notes. Long live The Miracle Five!!!!!!!

PRINCESSdie
Mandir(V)
A crossing place where worlds of divinity and humanity meet. Where the dead descend to earth. By seeing and touching, it is possible to ascend temporarily to heaven and experience the divine world displayed in the symbolism found throughout helping give shape to a divine reality that would otherwise remain formless.

This site has been selected to obtain divinity from the victims of Voorhees. The local spirits of the land have been driven away, seeds have been sown, and the earth has been smoothed to a perfect mirror. A circle symbolizing heaven and a square symbolizing earth forms a sacred pillar connecting the ‘body’ of the room with heaven.

There is a small chest holding jewels and seeds representing the essence of the Mandir(V), which is buried in the ground creating the heart of Voorhees.

Jason Voorhees born June 13th 1946 to sixteen year-old Pamela Voorhees.
Having been born physically normal, Voorhees became hydrocephalically deformed after drowning at Crystal Lake in 1957, where his body was never found.
Voorhees is responsible for killing over 146 people, not including the victims of dream deaths, victims from a rave, the 20 to 30 students who drowned on a sinking boat, the victims of accidental deaths, self-inflicted deaths, virtual reality deaths, Freddy Krueger, and the 60 marine soldiers with the entire population of the Solaris space station that die in an explosion, or the 9 people Jason’s mother killed before she was physically decapitated with a machete.

Prey victims, for they save you from his!

The Nave Gallery, P.O. Box 43600, Somerville, MA 02143. © 2004-2009. All rights reserved. info@navegallery.org

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